How to choose your mood in any moment

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Photo by Victoria Palacios on Unsplash

 

I'm always blown away when reminded that we have the power to choose how we feel; that we're not helpless victims of our circumstances. When we wake up, we can actively pursue a positive mindset or an energetic feeling, and not let our lack of sleep or overwhelming responsibilities dictate how we tackle the day.

There’s freedom from our funk.

This realisation of our personal power to choose our energy and mood gives me a thrill, because like plenty of other people I tend towards the passive end of the mood-setting spectrum, and often let what's happening around me determine how I feel. And I frequently end up feeling sluggish or rushing or cross—the busyness of life, and all that.

Lightbulb: I don't have to do that anymore. But, changing the habit takes work.

Last night, I got stuck into this recording of a Tony Robbins session in which he explains how we can choose our mood by actively changing our physiology (our state, as he calls it) and our focus.

‘The state you’re in powerfully impacts how you ‘see’ things, so change your state,’ Tony says.

‘Your life’s work is to stay happy and joyful most of the time for yourself and those around you. That’s the definition of success,’ he says. As a parent, I can completely see the enormous value in that mindset.

Bottom line: You and I can choose to feel good. And here’s how:

Step 1: Change your physiology or how you move your body. ‘Emotion comes from motion,’ Tony says, so the first step is to move and shake yourself into a highly energised state. On a scale of one to 10, we’re aiming for our energy to be a 10 and hardly ever below an eight, Tony advises.

Regularly ask yourself: Where am I on the energy scale? What’s my energy from one to 10? If it’s below an eight, try to raise it.

Step 2: Examine what you’re focusing on. Going over past hurts, potential disasters, and losses saps energy.

‘A coward dies 1000 deaths; a courageous man or woman dies only once,’ Tony says. Don’t imagine and live out potential dramas: ‘If it ever happens, feel the pain only once, not over and over again,’ Tony cautions.

In a nutshell: Don’t focus on ‘old movies’ (past hurts) but instead ‘new releases’ (great things going on right now) and ‘previews’ of wonderful things you’d like to come.

We have the power.

Later this week I’ll tell you what Tony says emotions really mean. Fascinating stuff.

 

 

 

 

Natalie Bartley